Health News

Age at First Period May Predict Heart Risk
Women who had their first period earlier or later than average may want to keep a close eye on their heart health and take action to lower their heart disease risk.
Getting Healthy May Improve Men's Fertility
Health problems that seem unrelated to men's fertility — like diabetes or high blood pressure — may damage men's sperm. And men can take steps that can both improve their overall health and make them more fertile.
Salt May Be Sweeter Than Sugar
Salt may be a little less sinister for patients with high blood pressure than once thought. And sugar may steal salt's spot on the list of blood pressure spikers.
For Obese Kids, Health Problems May Start Early
As more children become obese, related health problems like nonalcoholic fatty liver disease may be putting their health at risk.
Blood Pressure Rx May Not Pose Cancer Threat
A blood pressure medication once considered a threat to women's health may not be as bad as researchers thought.
Unhappy Marriages May Lead to Unhealthy Hearts
A bad marriage can be a real heartbreaker. That’s the message from a new study that looked at how marriage affects the development of heart disease over time.
Aspirin Did Not Reduce Heart Disease Deaths
Instead of the old adage about an apple a day, many doctors advise their patients to take an aspirin a day to prevent heart attacks. Which may be good advice. But new research suggests that aspirin may not keep patients from dying of a heart attack.
Rates for Some Types of Heart Disease Deaths Dropped
In recent years, death rates from most types of heart disease dropped. But a few types saw an increase in the death rate.
Health Officials Release New Stroke Prevention Guidelines
The American Heart Association and American Stroke Association have updated their guidelines for stroke prevention. The new guidelines focus on healthy eating, normal blood pressure and exercise as ways to lower stroke risk.
Blood Pressure Was Lower in Patients Who Visited Doctor More
High blood pressure may be about as common today as it was a decade ago, a new study found. But patients with high blood pressure who visited their doctor more often and who kept their high cholesterol in check were more likely to have lower blood pressure.