Health News

Getting Your Bell Rung
With football season in full swing, it's time to get reacquainted with concussions: what to expect, how to treat and when to return to action.
Over-the-Counter Pain Medicines Interfere with Antidepressants
Millions of people rely on antidepressants to keep the blues away. A new study has found that popular over-the-counter pain relievers can reduce the effectiveness of specific antidepressants.
Run Away Blues
Do you see those depression commercials on TV and think ' that's me but those medications don't work?' Well, you may be in luck because some people are taking a new medication - exercise.
Poor Children Ditching Depression Drugs
Depression affects about one out of five children, and when it goes untreated there can be tragic consequences. Deepening and recurring depression, substance abuse, and even suicidal behavior can increase.
Having More Doesn't Mean Greater Happiness
"Money doesn't buy happiness" is a common adage, and it may be more true than you think. People who live in wealthier countries seem to be more depression-prone than those in poorer countries.
Morning Sickness Linked to Behavioral Issues
Old wives tales abound concerning pregnancy. One popular one is "if the future mother is really sick, it's a girl." According to recent research, it may cause something else.
FDA Drug Safety Communication: Celexa
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is informing healthcare professionals and patients that the antidepressant Celexa ( citalopram hydrobromide ; also marketed as generics) should no longer be used at doses greater than 40 mg per day because it can cause abnormal changes in the electrical activity of the heart. Studies did not show a benefit in the treatment of depression at doses higher than 40 mg per day.
Match.com For Kid's Personality
It's no secret that children all have very different personalities, even siblings raised in the same household. Most parents have experienced that what works with one kid, doesn't work with another.
FDA Drug Safety Communication: Celexa
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is informing healthcare professionals and patients that the antidepressant Celexa ( citalopram hydrobromide ; also marketed as generics) should no longer be used at doses greater than 40 mg per day because it can cause abnormal changes in the electrical activity of the heart. Studies did not show a benefit in the treatment of depression at doses higher than 40 mg per day. Previously, the citalopram drug label stated that certain patients may require a dose of 60 mg per day. Facts about Celexa ( citalopram hydrobromide ) Is in a cla...
More Than Just The Blues
To outsiders depression can be difficult to understand. It's more than just sadness or a bad day, it's a medical illness that can affect personal relationships, work and even interests.