Health News

Can Hormone Therapy Prevent Chronic Illness?
Hormone replacement therapy is often considered for treatment of menopause symptoms. Could it potentially treat more serious conditions?
Menopause, Hot Flashes and Heart Problems
Estrogen — a hormone used to treat symptoms of menopause — has been shown to increase the risk for certain cancers. But other questions about the safety of estrogen therapy remain. For example, is it safe for the heart?
Some Hormone Therapies May Be Less Risky
To treat severe hot flashes and other menopause symptoms, women may receive hormone replacement therapy. Some approaches, however, may pose lower heart risks than others.
Recognizing Heart Risks in Black Women
While death rates for men with heart disease have dropped over the years, the same cannot be said for women. Among females, black women especially have seen even less progress.
Which Pill is Best?
Birth control pills are some of the most common medications prescribed in the United States. Therefore, it is important to know about the different risks that different pills have.
Diabetes Raises Heart Risks in Women
Diabetes patients face a high risk of heart disease and stroke. Even young women with the condition are susceptible, but controlling the risk factors can help.
Women’s Cancer Linked to Cholesterol Problems
You may already know that high overall cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke. What you might not know is that survivors of some cancers may be more prone to having high amounts of fat in their blood.
How Heart Disease is Different for Women
Heart disease is one of the biggest threats to women's health. Additionally, health problems affect men and women differently. A recent report looked at  the differences between women's heart health and men's heart health
Good News for Women's Hearts
Heart disease is a serious threat to women, yet clinical trials of one of the most common treatments for this condition have not included many women.
Fertility Treatment No Problem for Your Heart
Struggling to have a child can take a toll on a person's mind and body, especially if they are undergoing fertility treatments. But the process can pay off with a child — and possibly better health.