Health News

Sitting Down Often Could Put You at Risk for Cancer
Spending a lot of time sitting down has been found to increase the risk of chronic disease and death. New research says that excess sitting time can be even more detrimental to a person's health.
Smoking Tied to Large Number of Deaths in Asia
As smoking has begun to decline in some parts of the world, including the US, it is still increasing in other regions. A new study explored tobacco use in Asia.
Single Gene Doubled Risk of Lung Cancer
After decades of public health initiatives, it’s no secret that smoking is bad for your health and can ultimately cause lung cancer.
One Breath May Show Signs of Lung Cancer
Cancer screening can be costly and invasive, and it often catches the disease in advanced stages. What if cancer screening was as simple as blowing up a balloon?
Personalized Treatment for Lung Cancer Increased Survival
What if cancer chemotherapy could be customized for each patient's tumor? This individualized treatment may become a reality, as researchers test tumors for their genes and choose medications that work best based on those genes.
Timing of Chemotherapy for Lung Cancer
Besides the treatment itself, the timing of chemotherapy given to cancer patients can be important to the success of the treatment.
New Medication Proves Effective Against Lung Cancer
As scientists continue to look for better and more effective cancer treatments, one new study looked at a promising new medication in the fight against lung cancer.
High Fiber Intake May Lower Colon Tumor Risk
Adding fiber to your diet is generally a healthy choice. It seems that fiber also may decrease the risk of getting a particular kind of colon tumor.
Lung Cancer Survival in Women Linked to Hormone Therapy
More people die of lung cancer each year than any other kind of cancer. The survival rate among women, however, is better than men — and the reasons aren't exactly clear.
Fifty Years Later, Work Remains to Curb Smoking
Fifty years ago, the US Surgeon General first warned of the dangerous effects of smoking. On the anniversary of that announcement, the current Surgeon General has released new data.