Rheumatic DiseaseInfo Center

FDA Approves Two Meds for New Use
New options developed this week for patients coping with two very different arthritic conditions. T he US  Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two medications for treatment of both rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.
RA and Related Conditions Worldwide
As treatments for rheumatoid arthritis have improved, the long-term outlook for patients also has become much better. But other conditions linked to rheumatoid arthritis can still be a barrier to an otherwise healthy life.
Anti-TNF Medication Soothed Psoriatic Arthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis share many characteristics. While a certain class of medications — called anti-TNFs — has been shown to be a helpful treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, it remains unclear how well they work for patients with psoriatic arthritis.
Exercise for RA: Heart and Lungs Benefit
Rheumatoid arthritis can cause pain and tenderness in joints, so patients frequently become sedentary. A new study may give people with the disease a new reason to move.
Why Your Arthritic Legs Can’t Stop Moving
Do you think that the urge to keep your legs moving has nothing to do with your rheumatoid arthritis? Better think again. A recent review explained a possible link between these two conditions.
Can Magnetic Bracelets Relieve Pain?
Copper and magnetic bracelets that supposedly relieve pain can be found on TV ads, online and in stores. But do they actually work?
Arthritis and Depression: It's Not All In Your Head
Arthritis, which can lead to painful bones and joint damage, is a physical condition. However, according to recent research, it may also affect patients' mental health.
Knowledge is Power for RA
When it comes to dealing with chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, being able to understand the health information you receive from doctors can make a big difference in effective disease management.
The Ache on the Joints of Bigger Women
Excessive pounds can put added pressure on the joints of obese individuals. Man or woman, that added pressure may contribute to arthritis. But new research suggests that obesity may have a bigger impact on arthritis in women than in men.
Working Out for Your Arthritic Spine
If you were diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis, your doctor may have recommended that you watch your posture and exercise regularly. But have you followed these instructions in the same way you would your prescribed medication? Well, new findings may convince you to workout more.