Breast Cancer FemaleInfo Center

How Breast Cancer Might Affect Your Brain
The breast is a long way from the brain, but now it seems a breast cancer diagnosis might affect patients’ ability to think.
Breast Cancer and Hormone Therapy: An Evolving Relationship
When it comes to breast cancer risk, not all hormone therapies are created equal. While some may continue to increase the risk of cancer years after a patient stops taking the medications, others can decrease the odds of getting the disease.
Progress in the Fight Against Cancer
The fight against cancer is ongoing, but the newest numbers offer a bit of good news.
Talking to Your Doctor about Genetic Breast Cancer Risk
Many women who are concerned about their family history of breast cancer may want to discuss genetic testing with their doctors. Many of these women, however, may not actually end up having this discussion.
How Stress Management Could Help Breast Cancer Patients
Stress, sadness and depression are common to breast cancer patients. Learning to manage those feelings early on, however, could help patients for years to come.
Cancer Patients Live On
Cancer is a scary diagnosis, but there’s some really good news out there these days — more people are surviving.
Breast and Prostate Cancers: Double Trouble
Ladies, do you have a close relative or two who has had prostate cancer? This family history may play a part in your risk of breast cancer.
This Menopause Therapy Didn't Affect Death Risk
Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been a subject of controversy since past research linked it to health problems like cancer. New evidence, however, might clear up some concerns about this treatment.
Breast Cancer Rx Might Prevent Early Menopause
It’s good news for young women who have had breast cancer treatment and still want a baby. A medication called goserelin may help prevent the ovarian failure often caused by chemotherapy.
Too Much Cancer Screening, or Too Little? Opinions Split
It may seem strange at first, but in certain cases, some patients would prefer to never discover their cancer. Experts recently examined the complicated issue of cancer overdetection and found that opinions varied widely.