Alzheimers DiseaseInfo Center

Practice Makes Perfect With Alzheimer's Research
Drug development for any condition requires an immense amount of testing and time. Hopefully the process for developing drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease just got a lot faster, thanks to stem cells.
Sprechen Sie Dementia?
People who speak two languages may be at less risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.
Getting Started on Delaying Dementia
As life spans continue to increase, so the will risk of dementia in individuals, but new research from Sweden indicates people can minimize this risk.
The (Neuro)-Logical Next Step
A study from Loyola University suggests that neurological disorders like epilepsy and dementia are on the rise, but new therapies could soon be formed with the help of diagnostic tests and stem cell research.
Emergency: Why Am I Here?
When admitted to a hospital emergency department, elderly patients who suffer from dementia and delirium often do not understand why they are there. They also tend to not understand ER discharge instructions.
Road to Alzheimer's Research Paved with Good Intentions
A number of factors prevent Alzheimer's disease research from reaching its optimal potential, according to a new report.
Better, Faster, Smarter
In a placebo-controlled study, researchers in Sweden have shown that an operation can help patients who have dementia caused by white matter changes and hydrocephalus (a build-up of fluid inside the skull).
Food for Thought
A new study suggests efforts to determine the nutritional effect on Alzheimer's disease could be improved by using nutrient “biomarkers” in elderly people at risk for dementia.
Deadly Genetic Two-fer
The genetic mechanism that destroys brain cells responsible for Alzheimer's disease is also the cause of early development of Alzheimer's disease in people with Down Syndrome.
A Gentler Approach to Dementia
A study by the Institute of Aging Research suggests that treating the symptoms and stress associated with advanced dementia may be more efficient than aggressive treatment for the illness.