Health News

The Damage Done from the Get-Go
Using mice, researchers have modeled how the human body reacts to the early stages of HIV infection. The study also reveals how the disease is related to nerve cell damage.
Abacavir Update: Yes It's Still Safe, For Now
The FDA updated the public about an ongoing safety review of abacavir and a possible increased risk of heart attack. Since the announcement there has been conflicting information on the potential increased risk of heart attack.
Help is Here, but You Aren't Eligible
Lack of health insurance coverage may affect hepatitis C patients' access to current antiviral treatments, according to a new study.
Learning from History
In recognition of Black History Month we're taking a look at diseases for which African-Americans are at higher risk -- and what to do about them.
HIV Awareness: Low Income, High Risk
With more than 450,000 African-Americans estimated to have been diagnosed with AIDS since the disease became recognized in the early 1980s, HIV has impacted the black community more than any other race.
Waitlisted
Liver cancer patients who are HIV-positive and waiting for a liver transplant are less likely to receive the surgery, according to new research from France.
When Hepatitis A Turns Fatal
A study from South Korea has found a link between the Hepatitis A virus and patients with pre-existing chronic liver disease and identified the age group most at risk.
Enough to Leave You Speechless
Cancers of the tonsil and base of the tongue have increased in the U.S. among middle-aged and young adults, most of which are related to human papillomavirus (HPV).
Deactivating HIV's "Plan B"
Scientists have discovered how the HIV virus manages to survive inside immune cells by changing the HIV virus' molecular "diet" and then replicating with the help of an unexpected compound.
HIV Patients May Have Yet Another Strike Against Them
Individuals with HIV may be up to three times more likely to suffer stroke than the general population, according to a recent study.