Ascor

Ascor is used for the short term treatment of scurvy. Ascor may interfere with certain laboratory tests and the actions of some medications.

Ascor Overview

Reviewed: November 21, 2017
Updated: 

Ascor is a prescription medication used to treat scurvy, a vitamin C deficiency resulting in weakness, anemia, gum disease, and skin problems.

Ascor belongs to a group of drugs called vitamin C. Ascor works by replenishing the vitamin C stores in the body.

This medication is available in an injectable form to be given directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare professional.

Common side effects of Ascor include pain and swelling at the site of injection.

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  • Common Cold
  • Methemoglobinemia
  • Scurvy
  • Tyrosinemias
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Ascor Cautionary Labels

precautions

Uses of Ascor

Ascor is a prescription medication used to treat scurvy for up to 1 week of treatment for patients 5 months and older who cannot take vitamin C by mouth or will not get enough vitamin C by mouth.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Ascorbic Acid

For more information on this medication choose from the list of selections below.

Ascor Drug Class

Ascor is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Ascor

Serious side effects have been reported with Ascor. See the “Ascor Precautions” section.

A common side effect of Ascor is pain or swelling at the injection site.

This is not a complete list of Ascor side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effects that bother you or that do not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Ascor Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • antibiotics such as erythromycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, doxycycline, lincomycin, and bleomycin.
  • attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) amphetamine products such as Adderall and Vyvanse
  • warfarin

This is not a complete list of Ascor drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Ascor Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with Ascor including the following:

  • oxalate nephropathy and nephrolithiasis, a kidney problem. Your healthcare provider will monitor renal function.
  • hemolysis, or red blood cell break down, in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency.

Do not take Ascor if you are allergic to Ascor or to any of its ingredients.

Ascor Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Ascor, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication.

Inform MD

Before taking Ascor, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • are allergic to Ascor or to any of its ingredients
  • have or have had kidney problems
  • have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, which is a red blood cell issues
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Ascor and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

No well-controlled studies have been done in pregnant women. However, ascorbic acid has been used in pregnancy and no side effects have been reported. Women who are pregnant and have a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency should not receive more Ascor or ascorbic acid than the recommended dietary allowance. 

Ascor and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

It is not known if Ascor crosses into human milk. Women who are breastfeeding and have a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency should not receive more Ascor or abscorbic acid than the recommended dietary allowance.

Ascor Usage

This medication is available in an injectable form to be given directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare professional.

Ascor should only be used up to 1 week. However, repeat dosing is not recommended in patients who are less 11 years of age.

Ascor is only for treatment of scurvy. It is not to be used for vitamin C deficiency without symptoms of scurvy.

Ascor Dosage

The dose of Ascor your doctor recommends is based on age.

  • For patients age 5 months to less than 1 year, the recommended dose is 50 mg once daily
  • For patients age 1 year to less than 11 years, the recommended dose is 100 mg once daily
  • For patients age 11 years and older, the recommended dose is 200 mg once daily

Ascor Overdose

If Ascor is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting, it is unlikely that an overdose will occur. However, if overdose is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.