Anzemet

Anzemet prevents nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. Before starting this medication, tell your doctor if you have had heart rhythm problems, especially long QT syndrome.

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Anzemet Overview

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Anzemet is a prescription medication used to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy. Anzemet is also used to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting after surgery.

Anzemet belongs to a group of drugs called serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, which block serotonin from causing nausea and vomiting.

This medication comes in tablet and injectable forms. The tablet is taken by mouth within one hour before chemotherapy. The injectable form is given by IV (into the vein) during surgery.

Common side effects of Anzemet include headache, diarrhea, tiredness, and dizziness.

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Uses of Anzemet

Anzemet is a prescription medicine used to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy. Anzemet is also used to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting after surgery.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Manufacturer

Anzemet Drug Class

Anzemet is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Anzemet

Anzemet may cause serious side effects. See "Drug Precautions" section.

Common side effects of this medication include:

  • headache
  • diarrhea
  • tiredness
  • heartburn
  • dizziness
  • chills
  • indigestion
  • less frequent urination

Tell your doctor if any side effect is bothersome or doesn't go away. Especially tell your doctor right away if you experience any of these symptoms, which may be symptoms of serious side effects:

  • dizziness
  • fainting
  • irregular heartbeat (fast or slow)
  • chest pain
  • hives, rash
  • itching
  • difficulty swallowing
  • difficulty breathing

This is not a complete list of Anzemet  side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

 

 

Anzemet Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Because Anzemet can increase the risk of QT prolongation (a dangerous irregular heart rhythm) tell your doctor if you take any of the following medications:

  • medications for arrhythmia such as flecainide (Tambocor), quinidine (Quinidex, Quinaglute),
  • verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan, in Tarka)
  • diuretics ("water pills")

Some medications increase the risk of Anzemet side effects by increasing the level of Anzemet in the blood. Such medications include:

  • atenolol (Tenormin)
  • cimetidine (Tagamet)

Rifampin (Rifadin) may decrease blood levels of Anzemet.

Also, be sure to tell your doctor if you have ever received chemotherapy medications.

This is not a complete list of Anzemet drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Anzemet Precautions

Do not take Anzemet if you are allergic to any of its ingredients.

Anzemet may cause serious cardiac arrhythmias (abnormal heart rhythm) such as QT prolongation, a dangerous irregular heart rhythm. Tell your doctor right away if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  • change in heart rate
  • lightheadedness
  • fainting episodes

Your chances of developing QT prolongation and other serious heart arrhythmias are higher if you:

  • have had abnormal heart rhythms or someone in your family has had abnormal heart rhythms
  • have had other heart problems including heart attack
  • take certain medications that increase risk of abnormal heart rhythm. (See "Drug Interactions" section.)
  • take diuretics ("water pills"). See "Drug Interactions" section.
  • have low blood levels of magnesium or potassium (can be caused by certain chemotherapy medications)
  • are elderly or have kidney disease

Anzemet injection is not to be given to adults or pediatric patients for the prevention of nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy.

Anzemet Food Interactions

Medicines can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Anzemet there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving Anzemet.

 

Inform MD

Before receiving Anzemet, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions including:

  • allergies to medications
  • heart rhythm problems, especially long QT syndrome
  • if you have or have ever had heart or kidney disease, a heart attack, or congestive heart failure
  • if you have or have ever had low blood levels of magnesium or potassium
  • if you are pregnant or breastfeeding

Tell your doctor about all of the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Anzemet and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

This medication falls into category B. There are no well-done studies that have been done in humans with Anzemet. In animal studies, pregnant animals were given this medication, and the babies did not show any medical issues related to this medication.

Anzemet and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Anzemet is excreted in human breast milk or if it will harm your nursing baby.

Anzemet Usage

Anzemet comes in two forms:

  • tablet
  • injectable

The tablet form is taken by mouth within one hour before chemotherapy, for the prevention of nausea and vomiting.

The injectable form is given by injection into a vein (intravenously) during surgery to prevent nausea and vomiting (or to treat nausea and vomiting).

For children who are unable to swallow tablets or who need a smaller dose than the tablet form allows, Anzemet injection can be taken by mouth when mixed with apple or apple-grape juice.

Anzemet Dosage

Anzemet Tablets

The recommended oral (by mouth) Anzemet dosage for the prevention of nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy is 100 mg. Anzemet dosing for children 2 to 16 years of age is based on the child's weight.

The dose should be taken within one hour before chemotherapy.

Anzemet Injection

The recommended intravenous dosage of Anzemet injection is 12.5 mg given during surgery. Anzemet injection dosing for children 2 to 16 years of age is based on the child's weight.

Anzemet injection solution may be mixed into apple or apple-grape juice for children to take by mouth within 2 hours before surgery. When Anzemet injection is taken by mouth, the recommended dosage in children 2 to 16 years of age is 1.2 mg/kg.

 

Anzemet Overdose

If you take too much of this medication, call your healthcare provider or local Poison Control Center, or seek emergency medical attention right away.

If this medication is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting, it is unlikely that an overdose will occur. However, if overdose is suspected, seek emergency medical attention

Other Requirements

  • Store Anzemet tablets at room temperature in the container it came in, tightly closed.
  • Keep this and all medications out of the reach of children.