Health News

Strong of Heart
Women who receive cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) are 70 percent less likely to experience heart failure and 72 percent less likely to die than men, according to a new study.
Research Keeps Hearts from Failing in Time for Valentine's Day
Deficiencies in an enzyme known as DOT1L could put individuals at higher risk of certain types of heart disease, according to new research from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.
Belt with a Death-Grip
A new study finds that residents of the nation's so-called stroke belt (southeastern states) also have higher-than-average deaths from heart failure.
Knock, Knock: It's Nocturia
Nocturia, a condition in which individuals experience the frequent need to urinate throughout the night during sleeping hours, affects one in five U.S. men.
Disheartening Figures
Heart disease costs are predicted to triple in the next 20 years in the U.S., according to predictions from the American Heart Association (AHA).
Protection At What Cost?
According to new research from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, about a quarter of African-Americans have a gene that helps protect them against heart disease.
Costs of Cardiovascular Disease Enough to Make Your Heart Race
Costs associated with treating heart disease and heart conditions increased more than 200 percent in Canada from 1996 to 2006, and are expected to triple in the U.S. by 2030.
AHA to D.C.: Take It to Heart
The American Heart Association (AHA) has published a statement outlining the important role of advocacy in maintaing heart health during times of economic hardship.
Failed by Hearts -- and Hospitals
A new UK study finds heart-failure patients are twice as likely to die if they're admitted to general hospitals as opposed to cardiology wards.
Kidneys Can Cause Heart Failure?
The first-ever DNA sequence variant linked to heart failure also appears to play a role in causing the disease, according to new research from Washington University School of Medicine.