Health News

Hold Your Horses, Older Men!
One of the challenges of managing prostate cancer is measuring how aggressive it is. Because a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer doesn’t necessarily mean it needs to be treated.
Advanced Prostate Cancer Rx Approved
When cancer begins to spread from its original site, the bones are a common destination. Now, men with advanced prostate cancer have a new option that may help them live longer.
Should the UK Endorse the PSA Test?
Major medical organizations no longer recommend regular prostate cancer screening for most men. A new study looked at how lethal prostate cancer is in areas where screenings are low.
Vietnam Vets, Agent Orange and Prostate Cancer
Agent Orange was used during the Vietnam War to kill dense vegetation. The chemical created better views of what was going on on the ground. Agent Orange sometimes had dioxin in it – a powerful toxin that may cause cancer.
Prostates Seem to Need 'Sound-Sleep'
If you have trouble going to sleep or staying asleep, you're not alone. Many people know how frustrating these problems can be. But sleep problems aren’t just annoying; they could be unhealthy.
No More PSA Tests!
PSA tests are no longer recommended for men as screens for prostate cancer. Those are the new guidelines released today by the American Urological Association (AUA).
Rx May Lower Prostate Cancer Mortality
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Fortunately, it’s not a fatal cancer for most men. New research has found that one medication that’s used to lower cholesterol may also lower prostate cancer deaths.
Prostate Cancer May Prefer Big Men
Obesity increases a person’s risk of a variety of cancers. This connection now appears to affect men who have been tested for and found not to have prostate cancer.
PSA Test Outcomes Vary for Older Men
While the incidence of prostate cancer is greater in older men, the screening guidelines are murky. A new study analyzed what happened after older men were screened. 
A Crystal Ball for Prostate Cancer Testing
The statistics are pretty clear that most American men are not going to die of prostate cancer. But the question remains: who should be screened and how often? A new crystal ball may be on the horizon.