Health News

Olives, Nuts and Avocados, Oh My!
You are what you eat, right? That may be especially true with regards to diet and cancer. More and more research shows that healthier dietary choices lead to reduced cancer risks. 
Guys, Keep Your Fit Physiques!
Carrying a few extra pounds isn’t just bad for men's figures – it’s unhealthy. Being overweight or obese increases their odds of heart disease and certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer.
Cancer Treatment: Cost Vs. Effectiveness
As technology advances, physicians and patients tend to want to use the latest treatment options. These new therapies typically come with a higher price tag. But are they better?
Hold Your Horses, Older Men!
One of the challenges of managing prostate cancer is measuring how aggressive it is. Because a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer doesn’t necessarily mean it needs to be treated.
Advanced Prostate Cancer Rx Approved
When cancer begins to spread from its original site, the bones are a common destination. Now, men with advanced prostate cancer have a new option that may help them live longer.
FDA Approves New Rx, Xofigo
The US Food and Drug Administration today approved Xofigo (radium Ra 223 dichloride) to treat men with symptomatic late-stage (metastatic) castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to bones but not to other organs.
Should the UK Endorse the PSA Test?
Major medical organizations no longer recommend regular prostate cancer screening for most men. A new study looked at how lethal prostate cancer is in areas where screenings are low.
No More PSA Tests!
PSA tests are no longer recommended for men as screens for prostate cancer. Those are the new guidelines released today by the American Urological Association (AUA).
Rx May Lower Prostate Cancer Mortality
Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Fortunately, it’s not a fatal cancer for most men. New research has found that one medication that’s used to lower cholesterol may also lower prostate cancer deaths.
Prostate Cancer May Prefer Big Men
Obesity increases a person’s risk of a variety of cancers. This connection now appears to affect men who have been tested for and found not to have prostate cancer.