Health News

Mayo Clinic Updates Cholesterol Guidelines
The Mayo Clinic recently assembled a task force to update existing cholesterol guidelines.
Global Sodium Intake Exceeded Recommendations
Salt is a pantry staple and an ingredient present in many recipes. But too much of the seasoning can lead to high blood pressure and the potential for other serious heart conditions.
Heart Disease Risk Factors May Affect Certain Groups More
Heart disease is the leading cause of death and disease in the United States. And some people may be more at risk than others — even if they have the same symptoms.
Too Much Exercise May Be a Bad Thing
Cardiovascular exercise like running or walking has a number of health benefits. But too much exercise may be unhealthy, especially after a heart attack.
Lower Blood Pressure May Not Mean Lower Risk
The increased risk of heart problems in patients with elevated blood pressure is well-established. But lower blood pressure may not decrease the risk of stroke, heart attack and other complications.
Reducing Risk of Heart Disease for Men
Guidelines issued in November aim to reduce cholesterol and cardiovascular disease in adults across the board, but they highlight the risk men face when it comes to heart disease. Doctors may need to go even further than the guidelines suggest to keep men healthy.
Cholesterol Rx May Be Lifesaver for Diabetes Patients
For those with Type 2 diabetes, heart disease is a major cause of death. Cholesterol-cutting statins, however, may help fight heart disease and prolong lives.
Fitness May Counteract Cons of Sedentary Life
A sedentary lifestyle may not seem dangerous, but it can put good  health in peril. Some physical activity, however, may remedy its ill effects.
Obesity and Heart Disease Risks Common among Latinos
The obesity epidemic in America has led to disease and increased health care costs. This epidemic may be hitting some ethnic groups harder than others.
Ex-Smokers and the Obese More Likely to Take Prescribed Statins
Some research has shown that those who regularly drink or smoke are less likely to take their cholesterol medications. But people with a different unhealthy lifestyle factor do seem to take the medications meant to lower cholesterol and improve their health.