Health News

Do Smoking Women Weaken Hearts?
Smoking doesn't discriminate -- leading to health risks for anyone who picks up the habit. For women, that risk may be exaggerated after a heart attack.
Smoking Prompts Earlier Strokes
Smokers aren't just at an added risk for strokes. They're at risk at risk for having them up to a decade earlier than those who don't smoke.
Kids Need to Seize the Day
Kids shouldn’t have to worry about pre-diabetes or an increased risk for heart disease. They should be focused on enjoying life. But obesity is serious and affecting many children.
U.S. Plan Announced to Cut Heart Attacks
Working vigorously to reduce cardiovascular deaths, U.S. health officials have announced a national program that partners with private insurance companies to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes over five years.
America is Up In Smokes
Tobacco use is the most preventable cause of death in the United States, yet so many Americans choose to continue day after day. The rates are slowly declining, but by how much?
Smoking Ban and Diet Delights
There's no better day than today to change your diet and quit smoking. Benefits from these lifestyle changes appear to take effect within months.
Label Warnings Updated for Chantix
U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials have approved an updated drug label for smoking cessation medication varenicline (Chantix) with stronger warnings.
Reducing Risks Could Cut Alzheimer's
Moderate lifestyle changes may seem small, but they can provide large returns in better health. Exercising and smoking cessation are among modifiable changes capable of reducing risk of Alzheimer's disease.
Chantix Linked to 72% Increase in Heart Problems
Cigarette smokers may be ready to kick their habit, but a popular smoking cessation drug may only add health risks. A new study indicates that Chantix (varenicline) may come with a heightened risk of serious heart problems.
From Sexy to Gross
Every day, some 4,000 teenagers smoke their first cigarette. About 1,000 of them will become addicted daily smokers. Their new tobacco addiction will add to the $200 billion burden that smoking costs the United States every year. And with their first puff, these youngsters start the clock ticking toward an unhealthy - and likely fatal future. To combat this disturbing public health menace, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring all cigarette packaging to be wrapped in graphic and sometimes disturbing images starting next year.