Triptorelin

Triptorelin treats prostate cancer. During the first weeks of treatment, patients may experiencing worsening of symptoms such as bone pain or difficulty urinating.

Triptorelin Overview

Reviewed: November 26, 2012
Updated: 

Triptorelin is a prescription medication used to treat prostate cancer in men. Triptorelin belongs to a group of drugs called gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists, which help slow the growth of prostate cancer cells by affecting testosterone production in the testes.

This medication comes in an injectable form to be given into the buttock by a healthcare provider, once every 4, 12, or 24 weeks.

Some of the common side effects of triptorelin include hot flashes, headache, and bone pain.

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Triptorelin Cautionary Labels

precautionsprecautionsprecautions

Uses of Triptorelin

Triptorelin is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of the symptoms associated with advanced prostate cancer.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Triptorelin Brand Names

Triptorelin may be found in some form under the following brand names:

Triptorelin Drug Class

Triptorelin is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Triptorelin

After the first triptorelin injection, blood testosterone levels increase, which may cause a worsening of prostate cancer symptoms during the first few weeks of treatment. These symptoms may include:

  • bone pain
  • difficulty urinating
  • spinal cord injury
  • blood in urine
  • urinary tract blockage

Tell your doctor if these symptoms do not go away after a few weeks or if they become severe.

In clinical trials, common side effects of triptorelin included:

  • hot flashes
  • headache
  • bone pain
  • impotence
  • pain at injection site
  • difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep
  • leg or joint pain

Less common, more serious side effects can occur. Tell your doctor right away if you experience any of these symptoms:

  • hives
  • rash
  • itching
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • hoarseness
  • chest pain
  • pain in the arms, back, neck, or jaw
  • slow or difficult speech
  • dizziness or fainting
  • weakness or numbness of an arm or leg
  • not able to move legs
  • swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles or legs
  • bone pain
  • painful or difficult urination
  • blood in urine
  • frequent urination
  • extreme thirst
  • weakness
  • blurred vision
  • dry mouth
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • breath that smells fruity
  • decreased consciousness

This is not a complete list of triptorelin side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Triptorelin Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • medications for depression or mental illness; methyldopa (in Aldoril); metoclopramide (Reglan); or reserpine.

This is not a complete list of triptorelin drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Triptorelin Precautions

Do not receive triptorelin injections if you are allergic to triptorelin or any of the other ingredients in triptorelin injections.

Serious allergic reactions to triptorelin have occurred. Tell your doctor right away if you experience signs of an allergic reaction including:

  • an unexplained rash
  • hives
  • itching
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing

During the first few weeks of triptorelin treatment, testosterone levels may increase, causing some patients experience a worsening of prostate cancer symptoms or new symptoms including:

  • bone pain
  • numbness or tingling
  • loss of movement of part of the body
  • blood in urine
  • urinary tract blockage

If, after 3 or 4 weeks these symptoms do not go away, or if they become severe, notify your doctor.

With triptorelin use there is an increased risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, sudden cardiac death. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of triptorelin therapy.

 

Triptorelin Food Interactions

Medicines can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of triptorelin there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving triptorelin.

Inform MD

Before receiving triptorelin, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions including if you:

  • are allergic to triptorelin or any other medicine. Especially tell your doctor if you are allergic to drugs that are similar to triptorelin such as goserelin (Zoladex), histrelin (Supprelin LA, Vantas), leuprolide (Lupron, Viadur, Eligard), and nafarelin (Synarel).
  • have heart, kidney, or liver disease
  • have diabetes, cancer that has spread to the spine or urinary tract, or difficulty urinating
  • are pregnant or breastfeeding

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Triptorelin and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

This medication falls into category X. This medicine is not approved for any use in women, although, sometimes it is prescribed for "off-label", or unapproved uses. Triptorelin should not be used in women who are pregnant. Triptorelin decreases production of estrogen in women,  which can cause miscarriage if taken by a pregnant woman.

Before receiving triptorelin, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while receiving triptorelin.

Triptorelin and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if triptorelin is excreted in human breastmilk or if it will harm your nursing baby.

Triptorelin Usage

Triptorelin comes as a powder to be mixed with sterile water. It is given by a single injection into the buttock by a healthcare provider, in a medical facility such as a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office.  

Triptorelin can be given every 4, 12, or 24 weeks, depending on the dosage form your doctor prescribes. An injection of triptorelin 3.75 mg is usually given every 4 weeks. An injection of triptorelin 11.25 mg is usually given every 12 weeks. An injection of triptorelin 22.5 mg is usually given every 24 weeks.

Triptorelin may cause an increase in certain hormones in the first few weeks after injection. Your doctor will monitor you carefully for any new or worsening symptoms during this time.

If you miss a dose, be sure to make a follow up appointment.

Triptorelin Dosage

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Triptorelin can be given every 4, 12, or 24 weeks, depending on the dosage form your doctor prescribes.

The recommended dose of triptorelin is 3.75 mg every 4 weeks, 11.25 mg is every 12 weeks, and 22.5 mg given every 24 weeks.

Triptorelin Overdose

If triptorelin is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting, it is unlikely that an overdose will occur. However, if overdose is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.