Pentacel

Pentacel is a vaccine used for the prevention of diphtheria, tetanus (lockjaw), pertussis (whooping cough), polio (poliomyelitis) and invasive disease due to Haemophilus influenzae type b.

Pentacel Overview

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Pentacel is a vaccine used for the prevention of diphtheria, tetanus (lockjaw), pertussis (whooping cough), polio (poliomyelitis) and invasive disease due to Haemophilus influenzae type b.

Pentacel is given as a shot into the thigh or upper arm. 

Common side effects of Pentacel include tenderness, redness, and swelling at the injection site. 

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  • Other
  • Diphtheria
  • Tetanus

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Uses of Pentacel

Pentacel is a vaccine used for the prevention of diphtheria, tetanus (lockjaw), pertussis (whooping cough), polio (poliomyelitis) and invasive disease due to Haemophilus influenzae type b.

Pentacel vaccine is approved for use as a four dose series in children 6 weeks through 4 years of age (prior to fifth birthday).

Manufacturer

Generics

Pentacel consists of multiple generic medications. The generic medications are listed below.

Diphtheria Toxoid

For more information on this medication choose from the list of selections below.

Tetanus Toxoid

For more information on this medication choose from the list of selections below.

Pentacel Drug Class

Pentacel is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Pentacel

Side effects reported with Pentacel include:

  • tenderness, redness, and swelling at the injection site
  • increase in arm circumference
  • fever
  • decreased activity
  • inconsolable crying
  • fussiness/irritability

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any new or unusual symptoms after you receive Pentacel. For a complete list of side effects, ask your health care provider.

Pentacel Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you use:

  • immunosuppressive therapies, including irradiation, antimetabolites, alkylating agents, cytotoxic drugs and corticosteroids

This is not a complete list of Pentacel drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. 

Lab test interactions: Antigenuria (antigen in the urine) has been detected in some instances following receipt of ActHIB vaccine. Urine antigen detection may not have definite diagnostic value in suspected H influenzae type b disease within one week following receipt of Pentacel vaccine.

 

Pentacel Precautions

  • Allergic reactions. Tell your healthcare provider about any signs or symptoms of  allergic reactions, which include the following:
    • chest pain
    • swelling of the face, eyes, lips, tongue, arms, or legs
    • difficulty breathing or swallowing
    • rash
  • Adverse reactions with prior pertussis (whooping cough) vaccination. If any of the following events occur within the specified period after receiving a pertussis vaccine, the decision to get Pentacel vaccine should be based on careful consideration of potential benefits and possible risks.
    • Temperature of ≥40.5°C (105°F) within 48 hours, not attributable to another identifiable cause.
    • Collapse or shock-like state (hypotonic-hyporesponsive episode (HHE)) within 48 hours.
    • Persistent, inconsolable crying lasting ≥3 hours within 48 hours.
    • Seizures with or without fever within 3 days.
  • Guillain-Barré Syndrome and brachial neuritis. There is a causal relationship between tetanus toxoid and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Guillain-Barré Syndrome is a condition in which the immune system attacks the nerves. Brachial neuritis is a term used to describe an inflammation of the a network of nerves that originate near the neck and shoulder (brachial plexus) that causes sudden-onset shoulder and arm pain, followed by weakness and/or numbness.
  • Previous history of seizures. For infants or children with a history of previous seizures, an appropriate fever reducer may be given at the time of vaccination and for the following 24 hours, to reduce the possibility of post-vaccination fever.
  • Limitations of vaccine effectiveness. Vaccination with Pentacel may not protect all individuals.
  • Altered immunocompetence. If Pentacel is administered to immunocompromised persons, including persons receiving immunosuppressive therapy, the expected immune response may not be obtained.
  • Premature infants temporarily stop breathing. Breathing issues have been observed in some infants born prematurely. The decision about when to administer an intramuscular vaccine, including Pentacel, to an infant born prematurely should be based on consideration of the individual infant's medical status and the potential benefits and possible risks of vaccination.

Do not get Pentacel if your child:

  • had a severe allergic reaction (eg, anaphylaxis) after a previous dose of Pentacel vaccine or any other diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, or pertussis-containing vaccine, inactivated poliovirus vaccine or H influenzae type b vaccine, or any ingredient of this vaccine
  • had encephalopathy (e.g., coma, decreased level of consciousness, prolonged seizures) within 7 days of administration of a previous dose of a pertussis-containing vaccine that is not attributable to another identifiable cause
  • has a progressive neurologic disorder, including infantile spasms, uncontrolled epilepsy, or progressive encephalopathy 

Pentacel Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Pentacel, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication. 

Inform MD

Tell your healthcare provider your child:

  • had a severe allergic reaction (eg, anaphylaxis) after a previous dose of Pentacel vaccine or any other diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, or pertussis-containing vaccine, inactivated poliovirus vaccine or H influenzae type b vaccine, or any ingredient of this vaccine
  • had encephalopathy (eg, coma, decreased level of consciousness, prolonged seizures) within 7 days of a previous dose of a pertussis containing vaccine that is not attributable to another identifiable cause
  • have progressive neurologic disorder, including infantile spasms, uncontrolled epilepsy, or progressive encephalopathy

Tell you doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. 

Pentacel and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Pentacel falls into category C. No studies have been conducted in animals, and no well-controlled studies have been done in pregnant women. Pentacel should only be given to a pregnant woman if clearly needed. 

Pentacel and Lactation

Tell your doctor is you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. 

It is not known if Pentacel crosses into human milk. Because some vaccines can cross into human milk and because of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this vaccine, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this vaccine. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using Pentacel.

Pentacel Usage

Pentacel is given by a healthcare provider as a shot into the thigh or upper arm. 

In infants younger than 1 year, the the thigh provides the largest muscle and is the preferred site of injection. In older children, the upper arm muscle is usually large enough for injection.

Pentacel Dosage

Pentacel is given by a healthcare provider as a single 0.5-mL dose injected into the upper arm. 

Pentacel vaccine is to be administered as a 4 dose series at 2, 4, 6 and 15-18 months of age. The first dose may be given as early as 6 weeks of age.

Mixed vaccinations:

  • Pentacel vaccine may be used to complete the first 4 doses of the 5-dose DTaP series in infants and children who have received 1 or more doses of Daptacel vaccine and are also scheduled to receive the other antigens of Pentacel vaccine. However, data are not available on the safety and effectiveness of such mixed sequences of Pentacel vaccine and Daptacel vaccine for successive doses of the primary DTaP series. Children who have completed a 4-dose series with Pentacel vaccine should receive a fifth dose of DTaP vaccine using Daptacel at 4-6 years of age.
  • Pentacel vaccine may be used in infants and children who have received 1 or more doses of another licensed IPV vaccine and are scheduled to receive the antigens of Pentacel vaccine. However, data are not available on the safety and effectiveness of Pentacel vaccine in such infants and children.
  • Pentacel vaccine may be used to complete the vaccination series in infants and children previously vaccinated with one or more doses of Haemophilus b Conjugate Vaccine (either separately administered or as part of another combination vaccine), who are also scheduled to receive the other antigens of Pentacel vaccine. However, data are not available on the safety and effectiveness of Pentacel vaccine in such infants and children. 

Pentacel Overdose

Pentacel is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting. It is unlikely that an overdose will occur in this setting. However, if overdoes is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.