Paremyd

Paremyd is used to dilate the eyes for a short period of time during various medical diagnostic and surgical procedures. Do not use Paremyd if you have angle-closure glaucoma.

Paremyd Overview

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Paremyd is a prescription medication used to dilate the pupils of the eye for a short period of time during various medical diagnostic and/or surgical procedures.

Paremyd is a single product containing 2 medications, hydroxyamphetamine, and tropicamide. Hydroxyamphetamine belongs to a group of drugs called sympathomimetics, which work by releasing chemicals in the eye that cause the pupil to dilate. Tropicamide belongs to a group of drugs called anticholinergics, which work by blocking the action of a muscle of the eye. This causes the pupils to grow larger in size.

This medication comes in eyedrop form and is typically administered within 60 minutes of a procedure by a healthcare professional.

Common side effects of Paremyd include temporary eye stinging, eye and/or mouth dryness, and sensitivity to light.

Paremyd can also cause blurred vision. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Paremyd affects you.


 

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Paremyd Cautionary Labels

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Uses of Paremyd

Paremyd is a prescription medication used to dilate the pupils of the eye for a short period of time during various medical diagnostic and/or surgical procedures. 

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Manufacturer

Paremyd Drug Class

Paremyd is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Paremyd

Serious side effects have been reported with Paremyd. See the “Paremyd Precautions” section.

Common side effects of Paremyd include the following:

  • temporary eye stinging
  • dryness of the mouth
  • blurred vision
  • sensitivity to light
  • staining of the eye
  • quickened heart rate
  • headache
  • allergic reactions
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • skin paleness

This is not a complete list of Paremyd side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Paremyd Interactions

No drug interactions have been reported by the manufacturer. However, you should tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Not all drug interactions are known or reported and new drug interactions are continually being reported.

Paremyd Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with Paremyd including the following:

  • glaucoma attacks and increased eye blood pressure. Consult with your physician before taking Paremyd if you have glaucoma.
  • CNS disturbances. Consult with your physician before taking Paremyd if you have seizures.
  • psychotic reactions and/or behavioral disturbances. Consult with your physician before taking Paremyd if you have or have had psychiatric conditions.
  • serious cardiovascular events, including death due to heart attacks, arrhythmias and very low blood pressure have occurred shortly following Paremyd administration. Consult with your physician before taking Paremyd if you have low blood pressure or a history of heart disease.

Do not take Paremyd if you:

  • are allergic to Paremyd or to any of its ingredients
  • have angle-closure glaucoma

Paremyd can also cause blurred vision. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Paremyd affects you.

Paremyd Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Paremyd, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication.

Inform MD

Before taking Paremyd, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • are allergic to Paremyd or to any of its ingredients
  • have glaucoma
  • have heart problems
  • have low blood pressure
  • have seizures
  • have psychiatric conditions
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Paremyd and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Paremyd falls into category C. No studies have been done in animals, and no well-controlled studies have been done in pregnant women. Paremyd should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

Paremyd and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

It is not known if Paremyd crosses into human milk. Because many medications can cross into human milk and because of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this medication, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this medication. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using Paremyd.

Paremyd Usage

Use Paremyd exactly as prescribed.

This medication comes in eyedrop form and is typically administered within 60 minutes of a procedure by a healthcare professional.

Protect yours eyes in bright light while your pupils are dilated. Parents: do not to get this preparation in your child's mouth and wash your own hands and your child's hands following administration.

Pupil dilation will go away with time, typically in 6 to 8 hours. However, in some cases, complete recovery may take up to 24 hours.

Paremyd Dosage

Use this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully.

The dose your doctor recommends may be based on the following:

  • the procedure about to be performed
  • other medical conditions you have
  • other medications you are taking
  • how you respond to this medication
  • your age

The recommended dose of Paremyd for dilation of the pupils of the eye during medical diagnostic and/or surgical procedures is one or two drops instilled into the lower eyelid within 60 minutes of a procedure.

Paremyd Overdose

If Paremyd is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting, it is unlikely that an overdose will occur. However, if overdose is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.

Other Requirements

  • Store at 20° to 25°C
  • Protect from light
  • Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children