Nplate

Nplate helps increase blood platelet counts in patients with low counts. Tell your doctor if you notice any bruising or bleeding while receiving Nplate.

Nplate Overview

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Nplate is a prescription medication used to treat low blood platelet counts in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Nplate belongs to a group of drugs called thrombopoietin receptor agonists, which work by causing bone marrow to increase platelet production.

This medication comes in an injectable form to be given just under the skin by a healthcare provider. It is usually given once a week.

Common side effects of Nplate include headache, joint pain, and dizziness.

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Nplate Cautionary Labels

precautionsprecautionsprecautionsprecautions

Uses of Nplate

Nplate is a prescription medication used to increase the number of blood platelets in adults with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), a long-term condition of abnormally low blood platelet counts that may cause bruising or bleeding.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

 

Manufacturer

Nplate Drug Class

Nplate is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Nplate

Nplate may cause serious side effects. See "Nplate Precautions".

The most common side effects of Nplate are:

  • Headache
  • Joint pain
  • Dizziness
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Muscle tenderness or weakness
  • Pain in arms and legs
  • Abdominal pain
  • Shoulder pain
  • Indigestion
  • Tingling or numbness in hands and feet

These are not all the possible side effects of Nplate. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Amgen at 1-800-77-AMGEN (1-800-772-6436).

 

Nplate Interactions

No Nplate drug interactions have been identified, however, you should tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Not all drug interactions are known or reported and new drug interactions are continually being reported.

 

Nplate Precautions

Nplate can cause serious side effects:

  • Worsening of a precancerous blood condition to a blood cancer (leukemia). Nplate is not for use in people with a precancerous condition called myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or for any condition other than chronic (lasting a long time) immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). If you have MDS and receive Nplate, your MDS condition may worsen and become an acute leukemia. If MDS worsens to become acute leukemia you may die sooner from the acute leukemia.
  • Higher risk for blood clots.
    • You may have a higher risk of getting a blood clot if your platelet count becomes high during treatment with Nplate. You may have severe complications or die from some forms of blood clots, such as clots that spread to the lungs or that cause heart attacks or strokes. Your healthcare provider will check your blood platelet counts and change your dose or stop Nplate if your platelet counts get high.
    • If you have a chronic liver disease, you may get blood clots in the veins of your liver. This may affect your liver function.
  • Bone marrow changes (increased reticulin and possible bone marrow fibrosis). Nplate may cause changes in your bone marrow, but these changes may improve if you stop taking Nplate. These changes may lead to abnormal blood cells or your body making less blood cells. The mild form of these bone marrow changes is called "increased reticulin." It is not known if this may progress to a more severe form called "fibrosis." The mild form may cause no problems while the severe form may cause life-threatening blood problems. Signs of bone marrow changes may show up as abnormalities in your blood tests. Your healthcare provider will decide if abnormal blood tests mean that you should have bone marrow tests or if you should stop taking Nplate.
  • Worsening low blood platelet count (thrombocytopenia) and risk of bleeding shortly after stopping Nplate. When you stop receiving Nplate, your low blood platelet count (thrombocytopenia) may become worse than before you started receiving Nplate. These effects are most likely to happen shortly after stopping Nplate and may last about 2 weeks. The lower platelet counts during this time period may increase your risk of bleeding, especially if you are taking a blood thinner or other medicine that affects platelets. Your healthcare provider will check your blood platelet counts for at least two weeks after you stop taking Nplate. Call your healthcare provider right away to report any bruising or bleeding.

When you are being treated with Nplate, your healthcare provider will closely monitor your Nplate dose and blood tests, including platelet counts.

  • Injection of too much Nplate may cause a dangerous increase in your blood platelet count and serious side effects.
  • During Nplate therapy, your healthcare provider may change your Nplate dose, depending upon the change in your blood platelet count. You must have blood platelet counts done before you start Nplate, during Nplate therapy, and after Nplate therapy is stopped.
  • Avoid situations that may increase your risk of bleeding, such as missing a scheduled dose of Nplate. You should arrange for your next dose as soon as possible and call your healthcare provider.

Nplate Food Interactions

Medicines can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Nplate there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving Nplate.

 

Inform MD

Tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have had surgery to remove your spleen (splenectomy).
  • Have a bone marrow problem, including a blood cancer or MDS.
  • Have or had a blood clot.
  • Have chronic liver disease.
  • Have bleeding problems.
  • Have any other medical condition.
  • Are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Nplate will harm your unborn baby.
  • Are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Nplate passes into your breast milk. You and your healthcare provider should decide whether you will take Nplate or breastfeed. You should not do both.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Nplate and Pregnancy

Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Nplate will harm your unborn baby.

Pregnancy Registry: There is a registry for women who become pregnant during treatment with Nplate. If you become pregnant, consider this registry. The purpose of the registry is to collect safety information about the health of you and your baby. Contact the registry as soon as you become aware of the pregnancy, or ask your healthcare provider to contact the registry for you. You or your healthcare provider can get information and enroll in the registry by calling 1-800-77-AMGEN (1-800-772-6436).

Nplate and Lactation

Tell your healthcare provider if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Nplate passes into your breast milk. You and your healthcare provider should decide whether you will take Nplate or breastfeed. You should not do both.

Nplate Usage

Nplate is given as a subcutaneous (SC) injection under the skin one time each week. You may not give Nplate injections to yourself.

Your healthcare provider will check your platelet count every week and change your dose of Nplate as needed. This will continue until your healthcare provider decides that your dose of Nplate can stay the same. After that, you will need to have blood tests every month. When you stop receiving Nplate, you will need blood tests for at least 2 weeks to check if your platelet count drops too low.

Tell your healthcare provider about any bruising or bleeding that occurs while you are receiving Nplate.

If you miss a scheduled dose of Nplate, call your healthcare provider to arrange for your next dose as soon as possible.

Avoid situations that may increase your risk of bleeding, such as missing a scheduled dose of Nplate. You should arrange for your next dose as soon as possible and call your healthcare provider.

Nplate Dosage

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully. The dose your doctor recommends may be based on the following:

  • the condition being treated
  • other medical conditions you have
  • other medications you are taking
  • how you respond to this medication
  • your weight
  • your height
  • your age
  • your gender

Starting dose is 1 mcg/kg once weekly as a subcutaneous (under the skin) injection.

Your dose may be adjusted on a weekly basis to achieve optimal dosing.

The maximum weekly dose is 10 mcg/kg.

Nplate Overdose

If this medication is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting, it is unlikely that an overdose will occur. However, if overdose is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.

Other Requirements

Keep all medical and laboratory appointments.