Asthma Treatment Improves Your Quality of Life

Xolair improves quality of life and reduces hospitalization for sever allergic asthma

/ Author:  / Reviewed by: Joseph V. Madia, MD

(RxWiki News) Any treatment or medication should improve quality of life and ease symptoms. For severe asthma patients, one treatment is shown to not only improve quality of life but also reduce hospitalization.

A new study involving the asthma drug Xolair (omalizumab) has determined that the drug reduces hospitalizations, improves quality of life and the number of bed days decreased. For patients whose allergic asthma is difficult to mange, Xolair may be a viable treatment option.

"Consult your physician or pharmacist before starting a new medication."

Xolair is an injectable drug for severe allergic asthma patients who have not responded well to corticosteroid treatments. Xolair is used for patients with persistent asthma that is triggered by allergic reactions and who are more prone to hospitalization.

The Apex (Asthma Patient Experience on Xolair) study was conducted by Barts and The London NHS Trust and examined patient records from 10 different clinics. The study observed patients and hospital records for one year after patients were treated with Xolair.

Hospitalization was reduced by 61 percent after treatment with Xolair. Bed days were reduced by 70 percent. Quality of life was also improved at 16 weeks after treatment and was sustained 12 months after treatment.

Xolair was even more effective for a sub-group of patients who were hospitalized due to asthma in the 12 months prior to being treated with Xolair. Hospitalizations were reduced by 70 percent after treatment with Xolair. Additionally, bed days were reduced by 74 percent.

Future studies could expand the number of people involved or observe more long-term benefits of treatment with Xolair. More studies in the future can also focus on which patients may most benefit from Xolair treatment.

This scientific evidence gives doctor's and patients more confidence in choosing Xolair for severe and persistent allergic asthma. Any treatment that can improve a patient's life and reduce hospitalizations means a patient may be able to live a normal life and do things that may have been hindered by their asthma.

This study was presented at winter meeting of the British Thoracic Society.

All results are considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Reviewed by: 
Review Date: 
December 9, 2011
Last Updated:
December 9, 2011