Tracking the Disease

Crohn's, Ulcerative Colitis patients have a new way to communicate info to doctors

/ Author:  / Reviewed by: Joseph V. Madia, MD

(RxWiki News) Those iPhone applications just keep piling in! A new recording device to report diet, bowel movement, stress and pain related to Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (UC) is now available free of charge to patients.

This new app has an interactive chart for both the patient and doctor to communicate real-time data regarding these diseases.

"Help your doctor by collecting symptoms and quality of life data."

One of those patients enjoying the new app is the creator of GI Monitor Brett Shamosh, who passionate the possibilities regarding mobile health. Brett shares, "Removing my colon was a very tough decision and I wanted to have more data at my fingertips when I made it. I'm hopeful that emerging mobile communication technologies will lead to better-informed decisions and improved quality of life."

Co-Founder Edward Shin, MD, is also very enthused about the possibilities for GI Monitor as the device has recently quadrupled its application downloads. Powerful real-time data will provide a powerful tool for these patients.

GI Monitor allows Crohn's and Colitis patients to easily track symptoms using interactive charts to educate the patients how their diet, stress levels and lifestyle effect their disease. It also allows patients to share reports with their doctors. The newest application released includes an updated web-app that allows patients to compare their symptoms and medications to the averages within their diagnosis.

GI Monitor is free to patients and is currently available in the iTunes Store, Android Market and at

GI Monitor allows patients to:

  • Track Medications
  • Monitor Stress Patterns
  • Record Pain Levels
  • Log Meals
  • Easily Track Bowel Movements
  • Track Custom Symptoms
  • Track the number of glasses of water you drink.
  • Set a timer and get notified for your next glass.
Reviewed by: 
Review Date: 
June 15, 2011
Last Updated:
June 16, 2011