Maxzide

Maxzide treats high blood pressure and helps with fluid retention. This medication increases urination, so take it earlier in the day to avoid having to get up in the night to urinate.

Maxzide Overview

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Maxzide is a prescription medication used to treat high blood pressure and edema (swelling). It is a single medication containing two drugs, triamterene and hydrochlorothiazide. Triamterene and hydrochlorothiazide belong to a group of drugs called diuretics, which causes the kidneys to get rid of sodium and water while holding on to potassium.

This medication comes as a tablet. it is usually taken once daily, with or without food.

Common side effects of Maxzide include frequent urination, weakness, fatigue, and headache.

Maxzide can cause dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how this medication affects you.

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Uses of Maxzide

Maxzide is a prescription medication used to treat:

  • hypertension, or high blood pressure
  • edema, or fluid buildup in body tissue

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Manufacturer

Maxzide Drug Class

Maxzide is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Maxzide

Serious side effects have been reported with Maxzide. See “Drug Precautions” section.

Common side effects of Maxzide include:

  • frequent urination
  • headache
  • dizziness
  • weakness
  • dry mouth
  • fatigue

This is not a complete list of Maxzide side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Maxzide Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • thiazides, such as another medication containing hydrochlorothiazide (Microzide) or chlorothiazide (Diuril)
  • lithium
  • oral anti-diabetic drugs such as chlorpropamide (Diabinese), metformin (Glucophage), and pioglitazone (Actos)
  • non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin (Ecotrin), indomethacin (Indocin), and ibuprofen (Advil)
  • ACE inhibitors, such as enalapril (Vasotec) and lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril)
  • other potassium-sparing medications, such as spironolactone (Aldactone) and amiloride (Midamor)
  • potassium supplements

This is not a complete list of Maxzide drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Maxzide Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with Maxzide including:

  • Hyperkalemia: Maxzide can raise your body's potassium to harmful levels, possibly causing the heart to stop beating. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease or diabetes.
  • Metabolic or respiratory acidosis: Maxzide can increase your potassium levels, leading to acidosis.
  • Myopia (nearsightedness) or glaucoma, or vision loss due to an increase in eye pressure: Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms of myopia or glaucoma:
    • sudden, severe pain in one eye
    • decreased or cloudy vision
    • nausea and vomiting
    • rainbow-like halos around lights
    • red eye
    • eye feels swollen
  • Electrolyte imbalances: Maxzide can dangerously alter your electrolyte levels. Electrolytes are important for the body to maintain normal functioning. Tell your doctor if you have a history of kidney disease.
  • Hepatic coma: Tell your doctor if you have a history of liver disease.
  • Renal stones: Treatment with Maxzide can cause kidney stones.
  • Hyperuricemia: Maxzide can increase your levels of uric acid, leading to gout. Symptoms of gout include:
    • pain
    • swelling
    • discolored, peeling, or itchy skin
  • Folic acid deficiency: Periodic blood tests are recommended for patients who may be affected by a decrease in folate levels.
  • Metabolic and endocrine effects: Maxzide can impair your body’s metabolism and endocrine system. Tell your doctor if you have diabetes or parathyroid problems.
  • Hypersensitivity reaction: An allergic reaction to Maxzide can occur. Call your doctor if you have one or more of the following symptoms of a hypersensitivity reaction:
    • rash or hives
    • difficulty breathing or swallowing
    • hoarseness
    • swelling

Maxzide can cause dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how it affects you.

Do not take Maxzide if you:

  • have high potassium levels
  • take other potassium-sparing medications such as spironolactone (Aldactone) and amiloride (Midamor)
  • take potassium supplements
  • have a history of poorly functioning kidneys
  • are allergic to either triamterene or hydrochlorothiazide

Maxzide Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Maxzide, salt substitutes containing potassium should be avoided.

Inform MD

Before taking Maxzide, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • have a history of kidney, liver, heart, or parathyroid disease
  • have diabetes
  • have high potassium levels
  • have a history of kidney stones, gout, or lupus
  • are allergic to triamterene or hydrochlorothiazide
  • have a history or glaucoma
  • are pregnant or breastfeeding

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Maxzide and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Maxzide falls into category C. It is not known if Maxzide will harm your unborn baby. There are no well-controlled studies that have been done in pregnant women. This medication may be given to a pregnant woman if her healthcare provider believes that its benefits to the pregnant woman outweigh any possible risks to her unborn baby.

Maxzide and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

You should not take Maxzide if you are breastfeeding. It may be excreted in your breast milk and may harm your nursing child.

Maxzide Usage

Take Maxzide exactly as prescribed.

This medication comes as a tablet. it is usually taken once daily, with or without food.

If you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take two doses of Maxzide at the same time.

 

Maxzide Dosage

Take Maxzide exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully.

Your doctor will prescribe the appropriate dosage depending on your condition and response to the medication. The dosages range from 37.5 to 75 mg (triamterene) and 25 to 50 mg (hydrochlorothiazide).

Maxzide Overdose

If you take too much Maxzide, call your healthcare provider or local Poison Control Center, or seek emergency medical attention right away.

Other Requirements

  • Store Maxzide at 20º to 25ºC (68º to 77ºF).
  • Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children.

Maxzide FDA Warning

Hyperkalemia

Abnormal elevation of serum potassium levels (greater than or equal to 5.5 mEq/liter) can occur with all potassium-conserving diuretic combinations, including Maxzide. Hyperkalemia is more likely to occur in patients with renal impairment, diabetes (even without evidence of renal impairment), or elderly or severely ill patients. Since uncorrected hyperkalemia may be fatal, serum potassium levels must be monitored at frequent intervals especially in patients first receiving Maxzide, when dosages are changed or with any illness that may influence renal function.