M-M-R II

M-M-R II is a vaccine to help prevent measles (rubeola), mumps, and rubella (German measles). It is usually given to people one year old or older.

M-M-R II Overview

Reviewed: July 31, 2015
Updated: 

M-M-R II is a vaccine also known as Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Virus Vaccine Live. It is meant to help prevent measles (rubeola), mumps, and rubella (German measles) in people aged one year old or older.

M-M-R II contains weakened forms of measles virus, mumps virus, and rubella virus and works by helping the immune system protect you or your child from getting measles, mumps, or rubella.

M-M-R II is a vaccine that is given as a shot just under the skin (subcutaneous) of the upper arm. 

Common side effects of M-M-R II include burning or stinging at the injection site for a short time. 

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Uses of M-M-R II

M-M-R II is a vaccine that is given to people one year old or older. It is meant to help prevent measles (rubeola), mumps, and rubella (German measles).

M-M-R II may not protect everyone who gets the vaccine. M-M-R II does not treat measles, mumps, or rubella once you or your child has them.

Manufacturer

Measles, Combinations With Mumps And Rubella, Live Attenuated

For more information on this medication choose from the list of selections below.

M-M-R II Drug Class

M-M-R II is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of M-M-R II

Serious side effects have been reported with M-M-R II. See "M-M-R II Precautions" section. 

Common side effects of M-M-R II include:

  • burning or stinging at the injection site for a short time
  • fever
  • rash

Less common side effects include:

  • swellling of the testacles
  • joint pain and/or swelling

​This is not a complete list of M-M-R II side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

M-M-R II Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you are taking:

  • Immune Globulins (IG)
  • High dose steroids

This is not a complete list of M-M-R II drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

M-M-R II should be given one month before or after administration of other live viral vaccines.

It is not recommended to receive DTP (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis) and/or OPV (oral poliovirus vaccine) concurrently with M-M-R II (measles, mumps and rubella vaccines).

 

M-M-R II Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with M-M-R II including the following:

  • Difficulty breathing, wheezing, hives, or a skin rash may be signs of an allergic reaction.
  • Bleeding or bruising under the skin.
  • Seizures, a severe headache, a change in behavior or consciousness, or difficulty walking.

Do not GET M-M-R II if you (or your child):

  • are allergic to any of its ingredients (This includes gelatin and neomycin)
  • have a weakened immune system, such as an immune deficiency, an inherited immune disorder, leukemia, lymphoma, or HIV/AIDS
  • take high doses of steroids by mouth or in a shot
  • have a fever higher than 101.3°F (38.5°C)
  • are pregnant or plan to get pregnant within the next three months

M-M-R II Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of M-M-R II, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication. 

Inform MD

Tell your health care provider if you or your child:

  • have or have had any medical problems
  • have a history of seizures or a brain injury
  • have received blood or plasma transfusions or human serum globulin
  • have active tuberculosis that is not treated
  • take any medicines (This includes non-prescription medicines and dietary supplements)
  • are planning to get any other vaccines
  • have any allergies (This includes allergies to neomycin or gelatin)
  • had an allergic reaction to any other vaccine
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant within the next three months
  • are breast-feeding
  • have or have had a low blood platelet count
  • are allergic to eggs

M-M-R II and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications and vaccines based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

M-M-R II falls into category C. No studies have been in animals, and no well controlled studies have been done in pregnant women.

Pregnant females should not receive M-M-R II vaccine since the possible effects of the vaccine on the development of the unborn baby are unknown at this time. Females of reproductive potential who receive M-M-R II vaccine, should avoid becoming pregnant for three months following vaccination. 

M-M-R II and Lactation

Tell your doctor is you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. 

It is not known if M-M-R II crosses into human milk. Because some vaccines can cross into human milk and because of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this vaccine, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this vaccine. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using M-M-R II. 

M-M-R II Usage

  • This vaccine will be administerd by a healthcare provider.
  • M-M-R II is a vaccine that is injected just under the skin (subcutaneous) of the upper arm. 
  • If a dose is missed, your health care provider will let you know when you should have it.

M-M-R II Dosage

M-M-R II is a vaccine that is injected just under the skin (subcutaneous) of the upper arm. The recommended age for primary vaccination is 12 to 15 months.

If your child gets the shot when he or she is 12-15 months, a second dose is recommended. Often, the second dose is given right before the child goes to elementary school (4 to 6 years of age). If your child is less than one year old when he or she first gets the shot, a second dose should be given when they are 12 to 15 months old. Then, a third shot should be given between 4 and 6 years of age.

Non-pregnant adolescent and adult females of childbearing age who are susceptible to rubella can be vaccinated with M-M-R II (or live attenuated rubella virus vaccine) if certain precautions are taken. In many cases, it is convenient to give the vaccine to women at risk for rubella right after they give birth. 

Your doctor will decide the best time and number of shots by using official recommendations.

M-M-R II Overdose

M-M-R II is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting. It is unlikely that an overdose will occur in this setting. However, if overdoes is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.