Ipol

Ipol is a vaccine used for the prevention of polio (poliomyelitis) caused by poliovirus Types 1, 2, and 3 in infants (as young as 6 weeks of age), children, and adults.

Ipol Overview

Reviewed: August 10, 2015
Updated: 

Ipol is a vaccine used for the prevention of polio (poliomyelitis) caused by poliovirus Types 1, 2, and 3.

Ipol is given as a shot into the thigh or upper arm. 

Common side effects of Ipol include redness, hardening, swellling, and pain at the injection site. 

 

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Uses of Ipol

Ipol is a vaccine used for the prevention of polio (poliomyelitis) caused by poliovirus Types 1, 2, and 3 in infants (as young as 6 weeks of age), children, and adults.

Manufacturer

Poliomyelitis, Trivalent, Inactivated, Whole Virus

For more information on this medication choose from the list of selections below.

Ipol Drug Class

Ipol is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Ipol

Side effects reported with Ipol include:

  • redness, hardening, swelling, and pain at the injection site
  • fever
  • irritability
  • sleepiness
  • fussiness
  • crying
  • vomiting
  • an eating disorder associated with low body weight (anorexia)

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any new or unusual symptoms after you receive Ipol. For a complete list of side effects, ask your health care provider.

 

Ipol Interactions

No drug interactions have been determined by the manufacturer. However, you should tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements. Not all drug interactions are known or reported and new drug interactions aare continually being reported. 

Ipol Precautions

  • Allergic reactions. Neomycin, streptomycin, polymyxin B, 2-phenoxyethanol, and formaldehyde are used in the production of this vaccine. Tell your healthcare provider about any signs or symptoms of  allergic reactions, which include the following:
    • chest pain
    • swelling of the face, eyes, lips, tongue, arms, or legs
    • difficulty breathing or swallowing
    • rash
  • Guillain-Barré Syndrome. Although no causal relationship between Ipol vaccine and Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) has been established, GBS has been temporally related to administration of another inactivated poliovirus vaccine. Guillain-Barré Syndrome is a condition in which the immune system attacks the nerves.
  • Altered immunocompetence. If Ipol is administered to immunocompromised persons, including persons receiving immunosuppressive therapy, the expected immune response may not be obtained.

Do not receive Ipol if you or your child:

  • has a history of hypersensitivity (allergic reaction) to any component of the vaccine, including 2-phenoxyethanol, formaldehyde, neomycin, streptomycin, and polymyxin B
  • have an illness that is associated with a fever

Ipol Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Ipol, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication. 

Inform MD

Tell your healthcare provider you or your child:

  • has a history of hypersensitivity (allergic reaction) to any component of the vaccine, including 2-phenoxyethanol, formaldehyde, neomycin, streptomycin, and polymyxin B
  • have an illness that is associated with a fever
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • are breastfeeding

Tell you doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. 

Ipol and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Ipol falls into category C. No studies have been conducted in animals, and no well-controlled studies have been done in pregnant women. Ipol should only be given to a pregnant woman if clearly needed. 

Ipol and Lactation

Tell your doctor is you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. 

It is not known if Ipol crosses into human milk. Because some vaccines can cross into human milk and because of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this vaccine, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this vaccine. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using Ipol.

Ipol Usage

Ipol is given by a healthcare provider as a shot into the thigh or upper arm. 

Ipol vaccine can be given intramuscularly (into the muscle) or subcutaneously (under the skin). In infants and small children, the thigh is the preferred site. In older children and adults, Ipol vaccine should be administered in the upper arm. 

Ipol Dosage

Ipol is given by a healthcare provider as a single 0.5-mL dose injected into the upper arm. 

All children should receive four doses of IPV at ages 2, 4, 6 to 18 months, and 4 to 6 years. 

Children incompletely immunized: Children of all ages should have their immunization status reviewed and be considered for supplemental immunization as follows for adults. Time intervals between doses longer than those recommended for routine primary immunization do not necessitate additional doses as long as a final total of four doses is reached
 
Adults: Routine primary poliovirus vaccination of adults (generally those 18 years of age or older) residing in the US is not recommended. Unimmunized adults who are potentially exposed to wild poliovirus and have not been adequately immunized should receive polio vaccination.

The following categories of adults are at an increased risk of exposure to wild polioviruses:

  • Travelers to regions or countries where poliomyelitis is endemic or epidemic.
  • Health-care workers in close contact with patients who may be excreting polioviruses.
  • Laboratory workers handling specimens that may contain polioviruses.
  • Members of communities or specific population groups with disease caused by wild polioviruses.

A primary series of Ipol vaccine is recommended for unvaccinated adults at increased risk of exposure to poliovirus. The recommended schedule for adults is two doses given at a 1 to 2 month interval and a third dose given 6 to 12 months later. If less than 3 months but more than 2 months are available before protection is needed, three doses of Ipol vaccine should be given at least 1 month apart. Likewise, if only 1 or 2 months are available, two doses of Ipol vaccine should be given at least 1 month apart. If less than 1 month is available, a single dose of Ipol vaccine is recommended. 

Adults who are at an increased risk of exposure to poliovirus and who have had at least one dose of OPV, fewer than three doses of conventional IPV or a combination of conventional IPV or OPV totaling fewer than three doses should receive at least one dose of Ipol vaccine. Additional doses needed to complete a primary series should be given if time permits.

Adults who are at an increased risk of exposure to poliovirus and who have previously completed a primary series with one or a combination of polio vaccines can be given a dose of Ipol vaccine.

Altered immune system status: Ipol vaccine should be used in all patients with immunodeficiency diseases and members of such patients' households when vaccination of such persons is indicated.

Ipol Overdose

Ipol is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting. It is unlikely that an overdose will occur in this setting. However, if overdoes is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.