Cal-Maine Foods Conducts Voluntary Egg Recall

Eggs distributed to central states at risk

/ Author:  / Reviewed by: Joseph V. Madia, MD

Cal-Maine Foods, Inc. (NASDAQ: CALM) today provided additional product information related to the voluntary egg recall announced on Friday, November 5, 2010. The following, which constitutes an additional 120 dozen shell eggs that have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE), was added today to the products included in this recall.

Pippin Loose Medium,  Plant# 1457, Sell By/Expiration Date 11/07/10 

The earlier recall stated that Cal-Maine waas notified by the FDA that one of the Company’s suppliers, Ohio Fresh Eggs, LLC, Croton, Ohio, had a routine environmental study sample which tested positive for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). Cal-Maine purchased approximately 24,000 dozen unprocessed eggs from Ohio Fresh which were processed and re-packaged by the Company’s Green Forest, Arkansas, facility between October 9 and 12, 2010, yet the Company was only notified today. The eggs involved, which were not produced from Cal-Maine flocks, were distributed to food wholesalers and retailers in Arkansas, California, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. There have been no confirmed SE illnesses related to the purchased eggs.

In cooperation with the FDA, Cal-Maine immediately notified its customers and recalled specific Julian dates of shell eggs because they have the potential to be contaminated with SE. Click here to see which packages were included in this recall. 
Plant numbers and Julian dates can be found printed on the individual cartons. The Julian date follows the plant number, for example P1457-282. Salmonella is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections, endocarditis or arthritis.

Consumers who believe they may have purchased potentially affected shell eggs should not eat them but should return them to the store where they were purchased for a full refund.

Company Contact:
Dolphe Baker, President and CEO
Timothy A. Dawson, Vice President and CFO

Reviewed by: 
Last Updated:
November 9, 2010