Comvax

Comvax is a vaccine to protect against disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b and infection caused by all known subtypes of hepatitis B.

Comvax Overview

Reviewed: July 31, 2015
Updated: 

Comvax is a vaccine used to help prevent Haemophilus influenzae type b and against infection caused by all known subtypes of hepatitis B virus in infants 6 weeks to 15 months of age born of hepatitis B negative mothers.

Comvax is a vaccine that is given as a shot into the thigh.

Common side effects of Comvax include soreness, redness, and swelling at the injection site. 

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Uses of Comvax

Comvax is a vaccine used to help prevent Haemophilus influenzae type b and against infection caused by all known subtypes of hepatitis B virus in infants 6 weeks to 15 months of age born of hepatitis B negative mothers.

Manufacturer

Comvax Drug Class

Comvax is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Comvax

Common side effects of Comvax include:

  • soreness, redness, and swelling at the injection site
  • drowsiness (somnolence)
  • irritability
  • crying (unusually high and/or prolonged (>4 hours)
  • an eating disorder associated with low body weight (anorexia)
  • vomiting
  • ear infection (otitis media)
  • fever
  • diarrhea
  • upper respriatory infection
  • rash
  • runny nose (rhinorrhea)
  • chest congestion
  • cough
  • fungal infection in the mouth (oral candidiasis)
  • diaper rash

​This is not a complete list of Comvax side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Comvax Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • medicines that weaken the immune system

This is not a complete list of Comvax drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. 

Comvax Precautions

Haemophilus b disease may occur in the week after vaccination, prior to the onset of the protective effects of the vaccines. 

Use caution when vaccinating latex-sensitive individuals since the vial stopper contains dry natural latex rubber that may cause allergic reactions.

Your child should not take Comvax if they are allergic to Comvax or any of its components. 

Comvax Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Comvax, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication. 

Inform MD

Tell your healthcare provider if your child:

  • is allergic to Comvax or any of its components
  • has a fever
  • takes any medicines, even those you can buy over the counter

Comvax and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications and vaccines based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Comvax falls into category C. No studies have been done in animals, and no well-controlled studies have been done in pregnant women. Comvax should be given to a pregnant women only if clearly needed. 

Comvax and Lactation

Tell your doctor is you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. 

It is not known if Comvax crosses into human milk. Because some vaccines can cross into human milk and becuase of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this vaccine, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this vaccine. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using Comvax. 

Comvax Usage

This medication will be adiministered by a healthcare provider.

Comvax is a vaccine that is given as a shot into the thigh.

 

Comvax Dosage

Comvax is a vaccine that is given as a shot into the thigh.

Infants born to hepatits B negative mothers should be vaccinated with three doses of Comvax, ideally at 2, 4, and 12-15 months of age. If the recommended schedule cannot be followed, the interval between the first two doses should be at least six weeks and the interval between the second and third dose should be as close as possible to eight to eleven months.

Comvax Overdose

Comvax is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting. It is unlikely that an overdose will occur in this setting. However, if overdoes is suspected, seek emergency medical attention. 

Other Requirements

This vaccine will be stored and given by a healthcare provider.