Cocaine hydrochloride

Cocaine hydrochloride Overview

Reviewed: August 14, 2014
Updated: 

Cocaine hydrochloride is a prescription medication used as a local (topical) anesthetic to numb the mucous membranes of the oral (mouth), laryngeal (voice box), and nasal (nose) cavities. 

Cocaine hydrochloride belongs to a group of medications called local anesthetics. These work by blocking the pain signals to the brain. 

This medication is available in a 4% and 10%  topical solution to be directly applied to the area that needs to be anesthetized (numbed) by a healthcare professional.

THIS DRUG HAS NOT BEEN FOUND BY FDA TO BE SAFE AND EFFECTIVE.

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Cocaine hydrochloride Cautionary Labels

precautionsprecautionsprecautionsprecautions

Uses of Cocaine hydrochloride

Cocaine hydrochloride is a prescription medication used as a local (topical) anesthetic to numb the mucous membranes of the oral (mouth), laryngeal (voice box), and nasal (nose) cavities. 

Side Effects of Cocaine hydrochloride

Serious side effects have been reported with cocaine hydrochloride topical solution. See the “Cocaine Hydrochloride Precautions” section.

Cocaine hydrochloride topical solution may cause dead skin tissue.

Although cocaine hydrochloride solution is applied topically, systemic side effects may be evident such as:

  • Nervousness
  • Restlessness
  • Excitement
  • Euphoria
  • Confusion
  • Agitation
  • Hallucinations

This is not a complete list of cocaine hydrochloride side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Cocaine hydrochloride Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • antidepressants
  • chlorpromazine (Thorazine)
  • indomethacin (Indocin)
  • monoamine oxidase inhibitors such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), selegiline (Emsam, Eldepryl, Zelapar), and rasagiline (Azilect)
  • methyldopa
  • naloxone (Evzio)
  • reserpine
  • other local anesthetics

This is not a complete list of cocaine hydrochloride drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Cocaine hydrochloride Precautions

The serious side effects of cocaine hydrochloride topical solution are usually due to rapid and excessive absorption of the drug following topical application to mucous membranes. Reactions affect the whole body and involve the central nervous system (CNS) and/or the cardiovascular system. 
 
If large amounts of the drug is absorbed rapidly following topical application, the following side effects may occur:
 
  • Central nervous system side effects which may include:
    • Nervousness
    • Restlessness
    • Excitement
    • Tremors
    • Tonic-clonic seizures
    • Vomiting
    • Respiratory failure 
  • Change in heart rate. Small doses of cocaine slow the heart rate, but after moderate doses, the heart rate is increased. 
  • Increased body temperature
  • Contracted blood vessels
  • Dilated pupils (mydriasis)

This drug is not meant for ophthalmic (eye) use, because it can cause damage to the clear outer part of the eye (cornea).

Cocaine hydrochloride topical solution should not be used if you are allergic to cocaine or to the components of the topical solution. 

Inform MD

Before taking cocaine hydrochloride, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions.
 
Especially tell your doctor if you:
  • are allergic to cocaine hydrochloride or to any of its ingredients
  • are pregnant or you plan to become pregnant
  • are breastfeeding or you plan to breastfeed
  • have had a Myocardial infarction (heart attack) in the past
  • have seizures
  • have high blood pressure

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements

Cocaine hydrochloride and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.
 
The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.
 
Cocaine hydrochloride topical solution falls into category C. No studies have been done in animals, and no well-controlled studies have been done in pregnant women. Cocaine hydrochloride topical solution should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

Cocaine hydrochloride and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

Studies have shown that cocaine is detectable in breast milk after recreational use by breastfeeding mothers. Adverse reactions in nursing infants from cocaine use are possible. 

Breast feeding is not recommended in the chronic cocaine abuser & occasional use is discouraged during breast feeding.

With that being said, due to the possibility of rapid and excessive absorption of the drug following topical application, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or to not use this medication. 

Cocaine hydrochloride Usage

This medication is available in a 4% and 10%  topical solution to be directly applied to the area that needs to be anesthetized (numbed) by a healthcare professional.

Cocaine hydrochloride Dosage

The dosage varies and depends upon the area to be anesthetized (numbed) and other factors. Your healthcare provider should administered the lowest dosage needed to provide effective anesthesia.

Dosages should be reduced for children, the elderly, and for debilitated patients.

Cocaine hydrochloride topical solution can be administered with cotton applicators or packs, instilled into a cavity, or as a spray.

Cocaine hydrochloride Overdose

If cocaine hydrochloride topical solution is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting, it is unlikely that an overdose will occur. Your healthcare provider should have special emergency equipment and drugs immediately available at the medical setting where this medication is administered. 

Cocaine hydrochloride FDA Warning

Cocaine hydrochloride topical solution is not for injection or ophthalmic (eye) use.