Cerezyme

Cerezyme treats Type 1 Gaucher disease, an inherited, Jewish genetic disease affecting Jews of Ashkenazic descent. Cerezyme can cause serious side effects, during and after the infusion.

Cerezyme Overview

Updated: 

Cerezyme is a prescription medication used to treat Type 1 Gaucher disease, also known as glucocerebrosidase deficiency, which occurs when a lipid called glucosylceramide accumulates in the bone marrow, lungs, spleen, liver and sometimes the brain. 

Cerezyme belongs to a group of drugs called enzymes. It works by replacing the enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which people with Gaucher disease do not have enough of.

This medication is available as an injection to be given directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare professional. Your doctor will determine how often you need to receive this medication.

Common side effects of Cerezyme include fever, chills, upset stomach, and headache.

Cerezyme can also cause dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Cerezyme affects you.

Patient Ratings for Cerezyme

How was your experience with Cerezyme?

First, a little about yourself

Tell us about yourself in a few words?

What tips would you provide a friend before taking Cerezyme?

What are you taking Cerezyme for?

Choose one
  • Other
  • Liver Diseases
  • Splenic Diseases

How long have you been taking it?

Choose one
  • Less than a week
  • A couple weeks
  • A month or so
  • A few months
  • A year or so
  • Two years or more

How well did Cerezyme work for you?

Did you experience many side effects while taking this drug?

How likely would you be to recommend Cerezyme to a friend?

Uses of Cerezyme

Cerezyme is a prescription medication used to treat Type 1 Gaucher disease. Type 1 Gaucher disease is a rare inherited condition, and common symptoms include increased spleen and liver size, and low hemoglobin level (anemia) and low platelet count.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Manufacturer

Imiglucerase

For more information on this medication choose from the list of selections below.

Side Effects of Cerezyme

Serious side effects have been reported with Cerezyme. See the “Cerezyme Precautions” section.

Common side effects of Cerezyme including the following:

  • nausea
  • stomach pain
  • vomiting
  • dizziness
  • diarrhea
  • rash
  • tiredness
  • headache
  • fever
  • chills
  • back pain
  • fast heart rate

This is not a complete list of Cerezyme side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Cerezyme Interactions

No drug interactions have been determined by the manufacturer. However, you should tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Not all drug interactions are known or reported and new drug interactions are continually being reported.

Cerezyme Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with Cerezyme including the following:

Antibody development/hypersensitivity. Some patients develop antibodies while taking Cerezyme, which are produced by your immune system in response to something the body does not recognize as part of your own body. Developing these antibodies increase your risk for having a serious allergic reaction. Seek emergency medical attention if you develop any of the following signs of a severe allergic reaction:

  • chest pain
  • swelling in the face, eyes, lips, tongue, arms, or legs
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • rash
  • itching
  • flushing

Cerezyme can cause drowsiness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Cerezyme affects you.

Do not take Cerezyme if you are allergic to Cerezyme or to any of its ingredients.

Cerezyme Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Cerezyme, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication.

Inform MD

Before taking Cerezyme, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • are allergic to Cerezyme or to any of its ingredients
  • have taken Ceredase (alglucerase) and developed antibodies or had an allergic reaction to this medication
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Cerezyme and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Cerezyme falls into category C. No studies have been done in animals, and no well-controlled studies have been done in pregnant women. Cerezyme should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

Cerezyme and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

It is not known if Cerezyme crosses into human milk. Because many medications can cross into human milk and because of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this medication, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this medication. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using Cerezyme.

Cerezyme Usage

Cerezyme is available as an injection to be given directly into a vein (IV) by a healthcare professional. It is administered as an infusion that takes 1 to 2 hours to complete. 

If you miss an appointment to receive a dose of Cerezyme, contact your doctor to discuss whether you need to make up the dose. 

Cerezyme Dosage

The dose your doctor recommends will be based on your weight and the severity of your disease.

Dosing of Cerezyme is individualized to each patient. Your doctor will determine your dose and how often you need to receive Cerezyme based on the severity of your disease and how you respond to this medication. Initial doses range from 2.5 U/kg of body weight 3 times a week to 60 U/kg once every 2 weeks. Your doctor may change your dose during the course of your treatment based on your response.

Cerezyme Overdose

If Cerezyme is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting, it is unlikely that an overdose will occur. However, if overdose is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.

Other Requirements

Keep all appointments with your doctor and laboratory for monitoring while taking Cerezyme.