Apresoline

Apresoline treats high blood pressure. Take Apresoline with meals or a snack.

Apresoline Overview

Updated: 

Apresoline is a prescription medication used to treat high blood pressure. Apresoline belongs to a group of drugs called peripheral vasodilator. Apresoline works by relaxing the blood vessels so that blood can flow more easily through the body.

This medication comes in tablet form and is taken usually 4 times a day with food.

This medication is also available in an injectable form to be given directly into the vein (IV) and/ or the muscle (IM) by a healthcare professional.

Common side effects of Apresoline include headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea.

*Brand name Apresoline is no longer available. Generic versions are made available by several manufacturers.

Patient Ratings for Apresoline

How was your experience with Apresoline?

First, a little about yourself

Tell us about yourself in a few words?

What tips would you provide a friend before taking Apresoline?

What are you taking Apresoline for?

Choose one
  • Other
  • Heart Failure
  • Hypertension, Malignant
  • Hypertension, Pulmonary

How long have you been taking it?

Choose one
  • Less than a week
  • A couple weeks
  • A month or so
  • A few months
  • A year or so
  • Two years or more

How well did Apresoline work for you?

Did you experience many side effects while taking this drug?

How likely would you be to recommend Apresoline to a friend?

Apresoline Cautionary Labels

precautionsprecautionsprecautionsprecautionsprecautionsprecautions

Uses of Apresoline

Apresoline is a prescription medication used to treat high blood pressure.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Manufacturer

Apresoline Drug Class

Apresoline is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Apresoline

Serious side effects have been reported with Apresoline. See the “Apresoline Precautions” section.

Common side effects of Apresoline include the following:

  • headache
  • anorexia
  • nausea/vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • palpitations
  • tachycardia
  • angina pectoris

This is not a complete list of Apresoline side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Apresoline Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • MAO inhibitors such as tranylcypromine (Parnate), phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Eldepryl, Zelapar), isocarboxazid (Marplan), and rasagiline (Azilect)
  • Other potent parenteral antihypertensive drugs, such as diazoxide (Proglycem)

This is not a complete list of Apresoline drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Apresoline Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with Apresoline including the following:

  • Neurologic. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have some or all of the following symptoms:
    • numbness and tingling
    • muscle pain
  • Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms:
    • fainting
    • unexplained fever
    • rapid heartbeat
    • chest pain
    • swollen ankles or feet

Apresoline can cause dizziness. Do not drive or operate heavy machinery until you know how Apresoline affects you.

Do not take Apresoline if you:

  • are allergic to Apresoline or to any of its ingredients
  • coronary artery disease
  • mitral valvular rheumatic heart disease

Apresoline Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of Apresoline, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication.

Inform MD

Before taking Apresoline, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • if you are allergic to Apresoline, aspirin, tartrazine (a yellow dye in some processed foods and medications), or any other drugs.
  • prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially indomethacin (Indocin), metoprolol (Lopressor), propranolol (Inderal), and vitamins.
  • if you have or have ever had coronary artery disease, rheumatic heart disease, kidney or liver disease, or a heart attack.
  • if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking Apresoline, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery
  • if you drink alcohol. Alcohol can make the side effects from Apresoline worse.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Apresoline and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

The FDA categorizes medications based on safety for use during pregnancy. Five categories - A, B, C, D, and X, are used to classify the possible risks to an unborn baby when a medication is taken during pregnancy.

Apresoline falls into category C. There are no well-controlled studies that have been done in pregnant women. Apresoline should be used during pregnancy only if the possible benefit outweighs the possible risk to the unborn baby.

Apresoline and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

It is not known if Apresoline crosses into human milk. Because many medications can cross into human milk and because of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this medication, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this medication. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using Apresoline.

Apresoline Usage

Take Apresoline exactly as prescribed.

Apresoline comes in tablet and capsule form and is taken usually four times a day with food.

If you miss a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take two doses of Apresoline at the same time.

This medication is also available in an injectable form to be given directly into a vein (IV) or muscle (IM) by a healthcare professional when there is urgent need. Apresoline injection should be used only when the drug cannot be given orally.

Apresoline Dosage

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully.

The dose your doctor recommends may be based on the following:

  • the condition being treated
  • other medical conditions you have
  • other medications you are taking
  • how you respond to this medication
  • your weight
  • your height
  • your age

The recommended dose range of oral Apresoline (hydralazine) for the treatment of hypertension is 10 mg - 50 mg.

The recommended dose range of Apresoline (hydralazine) injection for the treatment of hypertension is 20-40 mg and can be repeated as necessary.

Apresoline Overdose

If you take too much Apresoline, call your healthcare provider or local Poison Control Center, or seek emergency medical attention right away.

Other Requirements

  • Store Apresoline at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).
  • Keep this medication in the container it came in, and keep it tightly closed.
  • Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children.